| | dissertation writing retreat

This past week at the Dissertation Writing Retreat has taught me a surprising amount about the collaborative side of dissertation writing—a concept which I think contradicts what many of us think about writing, and especially in this rather peculiar genre. As a consultant, I began the week with few assumptions about the work ahead of me, but was pleasantly surprised to find myself paired with two students who had remarkably clear ideas about what their projects entailed, and what thoughts would need to go into the writing to get their arguments across. These students, it seemed to me, didn’t need a lot of coaching to get the work written, or even a lot of effort to make their writing read easily. Both brought that to the table on the first day. What they did need was just someone to receive those ideas as an uninitiated reader (uninitiated, at least, to their specific fields and projects), who could then bounce back the most salient ideas to them. I’m fond of automobile analogies, and to me this process felt very much like taking these projects for a “test drive” every day—I would take up whatever new ideas they had presented for the day, do a spin around the block in them, and then report back to their authors what was working and what might need more tweaking.

| | dissertation writing retreat

 |  | dissertation writing retreat

Dissertation Writers Retreat Dissertation Boot Camps, Write-Ins, ..

It’s also important to acknowledge the people who did the hard work of organizing the Retreat – Cassie Book, our Associate Director, and Robin Blackett, our Administrative Assistant, and Assistant Directors Stephen Cohen, Amy Nichols, and Laura Tetreault. Thanks also to the fantastic consultants (themselves Ph.D. students) who do the most important work of the week in working with the writers: Layne Gordon, Meghan Hancock, Brittany Kelley, and Ashley Ludewig. And thanks to Dean Beth Boehm, of the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies for again sponsoring and supporting the Dissertation Writing Retreat.

Dissertation Writing Retreat - University of Minnesota

The Writing Center is hosting its annual Dissertation Writing Retreat this May, with sponsorship from the English Department, the Graduate School, the K-State Libraries, and the Offices of the Provost and the President.

Capella Dissertation Writers Retreat
Thanks to generous support from the Graduate School, Student Writing Support offers a free annual Dissertation Writing Retreat. Each May Term, fifteen dissertation writers from across the University gather in 15 Nicholson Hall for three weeks of concentrated dissertation-writing time in a supportive group setting. The Dissertation Writing Retreat is an initiative sponsored by The Graduate School to support graduate students in meeting their dissertation writing productivity goals. For three intensive days, doctoral students from all disciplines will meet in a quiet space for extended blocks of time that are dedicated to writing. During the retreat, participants will share their daily writing goals and progress, receive feedback to address challenges, and attend short lunchtime workshops. The retreat is also a platform for formal and informal reflection and discussion about writing, which can help to improve one’s writing skills. Students nearing completion of dissertation writing are especially encouraged to apply, however all graduate students in the dissertation writing stage or working on research writing for publication are encouraged to apply. The workshop topics may change or be added in response to participant needs.
Capella University Dissertation Writers Retreat Dissertation writers retreat ..

Dissertation Writers Retreat Dissertation Writers’ Retreat

Students writing dissertations have an additional form of support this summer. University Writing Services, housed within the Student Success Center, will offer Dissertation Writing Retreat.

Capella University Dissertation Writers Retreat Capella University launches series of writers ..

Dissertation writing retreat 2012 , 100% original papers

This past week at the Dissertation Writing Retreat has taught me a surprising amount about the collaborative side of dissertation writing—a concept which I think contradicts what many of us think about writing, and especially in this rather peculiar genre. As a consultant, I began the week with few assumptions about the work ahead of me, but was pleasantly surprised to find myself paired with two students who had remarkably clear ideas about what their projects entailed, and what thoughts would need to go into the writing to get their arguments across. These students, it seemed to me, didn’t need a lot of coaching to get the work written, or even a lot of effort to make their writing read easily. Both brought that to the table on the first day. What they did need was just someone to receive those ideas as an uninitiated reader (uninitiated, at least, to their specific fields and projects), who could then bounce back the most salient ideas to them. I’m fond of automobile analogies, and to me this process felt very much like taking these projects for a “test drive” every day—I would take up whatever new ideas they had presented for the day, do a spin around the block in them, and then report back to their authors what was working and what might need more tweaking.

Dissertation Writing Retreat by Wendy Carter - My name is Dr

How to apply for the Dissertation Writing Retreat

Abby Burns, Epidemiology and Population Health: The Dissertation Writing Retreat provided an encouraging environment to work quietly alongside other students who all have the same ultimate goal – completing their dissertation and graduating. It helped hold me accountable, but more importantly helped me build momentum that I hope I can run with in the following weeks/months.